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Two states allow felons to vote from prison while other states may permanently ban felons from voting even after being released from prison, parole, and probation, and having paid all their fines.

The chart below provides links to each state’s laws on felon voting and places each US state within one of five categories ranging from harshest (may lose vote permanently) to least restrictive (may vote while in prison). Applications for re-enfranchisement and clemency have been provided for the states which require them.

Felon voting has not been regulated federally although some argue that Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act can be applied to felon disenfranchisement and that Congress has the authority to legislate felon voting in federal elections.

In addition, 10 states restrict some people with a misdemeanor conviction from voting.

I. State by State Chart of Felon Voting Laws:

 

Click on the state to view its rules on felon disenfranchisement in PDF format. Documents were sourced directly from state codes, acts, orders, constitutions, or other state election office documents May lose vote permanently: Vote restored after: Vote restored after: Vote restored after: Unrestricted:
(Some felons may vote depending on the state, crime committed, time elapsed since completion of sentence, and other variables)
Term of Incarceration +
Parole +
Probation
Term of Incarceration +
Parole
Term of Incarceration
(Convicted felons may vote by absentee ballot while in prison)
10 States 20 States 4 States 14 States & DC 2 States
Alabama (more details)
Alaska
Arizona (more details)
Arkansas
California (more details)
Colorado
Connecticut
District of Columbia
Delaware (more details)
Florida (more details)
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa (more details)
Kansas
Kentucky (more details)
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland (more details)
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi (more details)
Click on the state to view its rules on felon disenfranchisement in PDF format. Documents were sourced directly from state codes, acts, orders, constitutions, or other state election office documents May lose vote permanently: Vote restored after: Vote restored after: Vote restored after: Unrestricted:
(Some felons may vote depending on the state, crime committed, time elapsed since completion of sentence, and other variables)
Term of Incarceration +
Parole +
Probation
Term of Incarceration +
Parole
Term of Incarceration
(Convicted felons may vote by absentee ballot while in prison)
Missouri (more details)
Montana
Nebraska (more details)
Nevada (more details)
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota (more details)
Tennessee (more details)
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia (more details)
Washington (more details)
West Virginia
Wisconsin